Xerox Launches ‘Healthcare Copier/MFPs’ Optimized for Healthcare with Kno2 Document-Exchange Cloud Service

healthcare-mfp

Xerox today launched its new Xerox Healthcare Multifunction Printer (MFP) Solution that is says will help healthcare providers digitize patient information for secure online exchange, improving care coordination, and patient outcomes.

Designed specifically for smaller healthcare providers, the Healthcare MFPs, connected by Kno2, a clinical document-exchange cloud service, help healthcare professionals access, search and route patient information to millions of healthcare providers across the country. The Healthcare MFPs are Xerox ConnectKey-enabled products that are equipped with ready-to-use apps to speed up paper-dependent business processes and make it easier for users to collaborate and work more effectively.

For instance, instead of faxing, mailing, and inputting patient information manually, providers using the Healthcare MFP can simply scan patient documents using the “Share Patient Information” button, select a provider’s address from the national directory and click on “send.” This avoids the need to make copies of protected health information – and risking violations of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accounting Act) – and yields an Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-compatible, electronic exchange.

Xerox says the Healthcare MFPs not only enable providers to stay current with EMR regulations, but they also allows caregivers to focus more on patients and less on paperwork.

The Healthcare MFP is available in the United States as a new configuration of any of the following Xerox MFPs: Xerox WorkCentre 3655i; Xerox WorkCentre 5865i/5875i/5890i; Xerox WorkCentre 5945i/5955i; Xerox WorkCentre 6655i; Xerox WorkCentre 7220i/7225i; and Xerox WorkCentre 7830i/7835i/7845i/7855i. Pricing for the Healthcare MFP starts at around $2,500, or about $10 per month additionally for a typical lease for a comparable standard Xerox WorkCentre MFP.­

Key features of the Healthcare MFP, connected by Kno2, include:

  • Share patient information right from the MFP across a HIPAA-compliant network to better coordinate care.
  • MFP touch-panel access to a national healthcare network of more than one million providers.
  • Paper is converted into usable, relevant, and “structured” patient documentation.
  • Direct messaging via Kno2 over the Surescripts HISP, the largest and most secure health information network in the United States, and document query via Carequality.
  • Ability to request patient information electronically, reducing physician wait time.
  • A range of ways to exchange information depending on current provider capabilities, and the flexibility to grow into additional interoperability, all using an accredited framework through DirectTrust, an email system for healthcare providers.
  • Equifax services for identity verification to secure patient information from start to finish.

Tracey Koziol, senior vice president of Xerox’s Office and Solutions Business Group, described various applications for the new Healthcare MFPs: “For example, a mid-sized urgent-care provider in Dallas, Texas, found that the Healthcare MFP not only saved the time it takes to transfer patient information, but also time it took to redo forms due to inputting errors – with a census of 500 patients, that adds up to considerable time saved. The Healthcare MFP provides a secure digital-exchange workflow solution that is both intuitive and familiar, making actionable clinical information available more quickly to the care community, resulting in better patient outcomes.”

For more information on Xerox’s Healthcare MFPs, visit Xerox here.

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2 Responses

  1. Derwin says:

    Would this MFP be ransomware proof? Or could it fall victim to the same type of attack that hindered Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital? http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/whitehside-yeo-hollywood-presby-ransomware/

    • Terry Wirth says:

      Since MFPs are used to print, scan and send, and copy confidential documents, their access via network back doors has been hardened for quite some time. Otherwise, vendors would never be able to sell them to government agencies who buy more of them than any other entity. Even if hackers access the local network, access to the internal encrypted data of attached MFPs is well protected.

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